Julie Kristine Hoss Pedigree

Ancestors of Julie Kristine Hoss, what they did and where they lived.

The "General" Amos Burdine

"You see, gentlemen, the surveyor first gits a obligation across the stream, and sticks down his compass. Then he leanders up or down the river, as the case may be, and gits a nuther obligation from that; then he leanders back to the first obligation and works it out by figgurs. It's simple enough," added the old General, "and I could do it myself, although I don't know a darned thing about figgers." - War of 1812 veteran and pioneer of Kentucky, Missouri and Arkansas, Amos "The General" Burdine, on how an engineer could measure the distance across the Cuivre River. Quoted from page 519, "Adventures of Amos Burdine", A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri, with Numerous Sketches, Anecdotes, Adventures, Etc. Relating to Early Days in Missouri. St. Louis, MO, USA; 1876

"General" Amos Burdine is Julie's 5th great grandfather (1) through her paternal grandmother, Fern Burdine.

From page 134, "A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri",

"Burdine was a great hunter, and killed more deer than any other half-dozen men in the vicinity."(1)

From page 493, History of St. Charles County, Missouri,

Gen. Amos Burdine, as he was called... married Jennie Davidson, and came to Missouri in 1811. He settled in Dog Prairie, in St. Charles county, and built his cabin on the James Mackey claim. Soon after he came to Missouri, the earthquakes at New Madrid, Mo., occurred and the shaking of the earth caused the boards that composed the roof of his cabin to rattle so that he imagined there were Indians up there trying to get in. So rousing his sons (for it was at night), they secured their guns and began to fire through the roof, which they so completely riddled with bullets, that it would not afterwards turn rain. He was a believer in witches, as were many of the early settlers and used to brand his cattle in the forehead with a hot shoe hammer, to keep the witches from killing them. Burdine was a great hunter, and killed more deer than any other half dozen men in the vicinity. He used the skins of the animals he killed for beds and bed clothing, which was a common thing among the people of that day. The General could mimic the cry of any animal or bird and often imitated wolves and panthers, for the purpose of scaring deer out of the brush, so he could shoot them. A party of hunters heard him one day screaming like a panther, and imagining they were in close proximity to one of those ferocious animals they put spurs to their horses and rode for their lives. He gave names to nearly all of the streams in his vicinity, and Chain-of-Rocks on Cuivre owes is appropriate title to him. Burdine was a man of medium size, but his wife was very large and heavy. Some amusing anecdotes of this original character will be found under the head of "Anecdotes and Adventures." The General's wife died of cholera in 1832, and some years afterwards he moved his family to Arkansas.

(1) Amos Burdine sr, William Burdine, Nathaniel Burdine, William Henry Burdine, Beecher Claude Burdine,Fern Burdine, Kurt David Hoss, Julie Kristine Hoss

Amos Burdine, CAPT. HURL'S COMPANY, MOUNTED, MISSOURI MILITIA, CORPORAL, Direct Data Capture, comp. U.S., War of 1812 Service Records, 1812-1815 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: National Archives and Records Administration. Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M602, 234 rolls.

Dog Prarie, St. Charles County. Ibid, page 134

Greetings

The primary purpose of this site is to collect and categorise the family histories and genealogical proofs of Julie Kristine Turlington (née Hoss). The secondary purpose is to collect and categorize information on the places those ancestors lived. Tertiary information involves the use of DNA testing in genealogy and links to relatives’ DNA results, family DNA registries, and other DNA information. All of the pages in the above three categories also have an "about" page describing the format and purpose of the page in detail and a "help" page describing research and formatting issues that require help. All pages contain links in the left column for further research or for genealogical and historical proofs.

Julie's parents are Kurt David Hoss and Beverly Kay (nee) Cooley. They divorced when Julie was 5 years old. Julie lived in Mexico City from the time she was 5 years of age until 9, when her mother divorced for a second time and moved back to Houston with Julie. Julie attended St. Thomas Episcopal School and graduated from Baylor University, where she played on the women's rugby team.

In December 2007 while working at a bank nearby Tulsa's Edison Preparatory High School, Julie met Edwin Hardee Turlington jr, a teacher who came into the bank for a home loan. They married on 4 July, 2008 shortly after Julie's father told Ed that Julie would never live in a town smaller than Tulsa. As a condition to marriage, Ed gave Julie the option of working as a housewife or teaching and Julie obtained her license to teach in the summer of 2008.The couple moved to Hugo, Oklahoma (population less than 6000) where Julie taught and Ed was the School Resource Officer. Their first child, Edwin Hardee Turlington III, known as "Hardee" (named after his third great grandfather Robert Augustus hardee, an Infantry Captain of Georgia's 9th Infantry Regiment), was born in Paris, Texas. The following year both obtained teaching jobs in the Oklahoma Panhandle (known as "No Man's Land" prior to Statehood). Ed taught and coached at Hardesty (population less than 300),in Texas County and Julie taught at Turpin (an unincorporated community of less than 500 people) in Beaver County. Oklahoma's second largest county, Texas County has a population density of 10 people per square mile. Beaver is Oklahoma's fifth largest county with a population density of 3 people per square mile.

Although he had resided on three continents and lived in a dozen countries, it was always Ed's intention to marry and raise his family on the Oklahoma Missouri border, where his ancestors pioneered before statehood. With the birth of their second son, Hoss Britton Turlington in the fall of 2011, Ed decided to move the family one last time to Ottawa County, Oklahoma where his wife found employment teaching Science at Miami High School. Ed's little brother, Lance, went house hunting with him, while on a 4 day pass from Ft Leavenworth for Thanksgiving 2013. They found a small farm for sale 3 miles from South West City, Missouri in a clearing of woods at the bottom of a holler on the Ozark Mountains' Springfield plateau. Lance bought a neighboring 8 acres as a quick means to resolve an easement issue, and year later, Ed and Julie had moved with their boys and new daughter, Audrey Maxine (named after Julie's and Ed's maternal Grandmothers), to the farm. The farm is registered as Hoss Turlingtons Bee and Goat Farm (named after Julie's father who helped very much in its establishment and continues to help very much). They raise St. Croix Sheep, La Mancha Goats, Honey Bees, Red Bourbon Turkeys, African Grey Geese, several dozen chickens of various breeds and their Turkish Boz Shepherd, "Duchess".

Julie has over three hundred sky dives, is a certified scuba diver, certified private investigator and a Jeet Kune Do Instructor.

The couple's fourth child (in their seven years of marriage), John Duke Kelly Turlington, was born March 2016. For information concerning the original John Duke Kelly see http://www.hossturlingtons.com/jdk.htm.

Texas Confederates

A native Texan, Julie is currently applying for membership to the Cowskin Prairie Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy under her third great grandfathers 1st Texas Partisan Ranger Henry Price (1) and Infantry Corporal Peter Burke (2) of Texas's famed "Waul's Legion". Julie's mother in law is applying to the Cowskin Prairie chapter with her.

Julie's revolutionary ancestor's include her 5th great grandfather Johann Hoss(3), her fourth and fifth great grandfathers Azariah Cooley II (4) and Azariah Cooley III,and her sixth great grandfather Virginian James McCutcheon (5). James McCutcheon fought Indians after the Revolution and is a veteran of the Battle of Tippecanoe. Other Indian War veterans include Julie's fifth great grandfather, Newton County Arkansas pioneer and justice of the peace Ephraim Greenhaw (6) . Julie's mother in law is applying with Julie to the Carthage, Joplin chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

(1)Henry Price, Thomas Washington Price, Winnifred Irene Price, Ralph Haland Hoss, Kurt D Hoss, Julie Kristine Hoss

(2)Peter Pressler Burke, Minnie Katherine Burke, Winnifred Irene Price, Ralph Haland Hoss, Kurt David Hoss, Julie Kristine Hoss

(3)Johann Christian Hass, David Hoss, Christian Hoss, Nelson Harvey Hoss, Ralph Wynne Hoss, Ralph Haland Hoss, Kurt D Hoss, Julie Kristine Hoss

(4)Azariah Cooley II (DAR A025528), Azariah Cooley III (DAR A025528), Azariah Cooley IV, George Rich Cooley, George C Cooley, Grover Ward Cooley, Raymond Ward Cooley, Kay Cooley,Julie Kristine Hoss

(5)James McCutcheon (DAR A076121), Ezekial Norris McCutcheon, Andrew Jackson McCutcheon, Frank Campbell McCutcheon, Ella McCutcheon, Vesta Nichols, Fern Burdine, Kurt D Hoss, Julie Kristine Hoss

(6) Ephriam B. Greenhaw, Sarah Ann Greenhaw, Frank Campbell McCutcheon, Ella McCutcheon, Vesta Nichols, Fern Burdine, Kurt D Hoss